TCO 6. In April of 2003, health officials in Toronto, Canada's largest city, started seeing cases of an acute respiratory disease of unknown origin. The onset of the disease was sudden and deadly. Dubbed SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome), the disease killed 30 people in two different outbreak waves. The origins of the viral disease were unknown for weeks, as was how SARS spread. Even though the victims were clustered in healthcare and elder care facilities, everyone in Toronto, a city of three million people, grew increasingly anxious and fearful. Conventions and public events were cancelled, and people watched each other with suspicion to detect any signs of the illness. Discuss this with respect to the effects of suggestibility that Myers writes about in Chapter 6. Be specific as to what aspects of suggestibility apply to the case.

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TCO 6. In April of 2003, health officials in Toronto, Canada’s largest city, started seeing cases of an acute respiratory disease of unknown origin. The onset of the disease was sudden and deadly. Dubbed SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome), the disease killed 30 people in two different outbreak waves. The origins of the viral disease were unknown for weeks, as was how SARS spread. Even though the victims were clustered in healthcare and elder care facilities, everyone in Toronto, a city of three million people, grew increasingly anxious and fearful. Conventions and public events were cancelled, and people watched each other with suspicion to detect any signs of the illness. Discuss this with respect to the effects of suggestibility that Myers writes about in Chapter 6. Be specific as to what aspects of suggestibility apply to the case.

TCO 6. In April of 2003, health officials in Toronto, Canada’s largest city, started seeing cases of an acute respiratory disease of unknown origin. The onset of the disease was sudden and deadly. Dubbed SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome), the disease killed 30 people in two different outbreak waves. The origins of the viral disease were unknown for weeks, as was how SARS spread. Even though the victims were clustered in healthcare and elder care facilities, everyone in Toronto, a city of three million people, grew increasingly anxious and fearful. Conventions and public events were cancelled, and people watched each other with suspicion to detect any signs of the illness. Discuss this with respect to the effects of suggestibility that Myers writes about in Chapter 6. Be specific as to what aspects of suggestibility apply to the case.

TCO 6. In April of 2003, health officials in Toronto, Canada’s largest city, started seeing cases of an acute respiratory disease of unknown origin. The onset of the disease was sudden and deadly. Dubbed SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome), the disease killed 30 people in two different outbreak waves. The origins of the viral disease were unknown for weeks, as was how SARS spread. Even though the victims were clustered in healthcare and elder care facilities, everyone in Toronto, a city of three million people, grew increasingly anxious and fearful. Conventions and public events were cancelled, and people watched each other with suspicion to detect any signs of the illness. Discuss this with respect to the effects of suggestibility that Myers writes about in Chapter 6. Be specific as to what aspects of suggestibility apply to the case.

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TCO 6. In April of 2003, health officials in Toronto, Canada’s largest city, started seeing cases of an acute respiratory disease of unknown origin. The onset of the disease was sudden and deadly. Dubbed SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome), the disease killed 30 people in two different outbreak waves. The origins of the viral disease were unknown for weeks, as was how SARS spread. Even though the victims were clustered in healthcare and elder care facilities, everyone in Toronto, a city of three million people, grew increasingly anxious and fearful. Conventions and public events were cancelled, and people watched each other with suspicion to detect any signs of the illness. Discuss this with respect to the effects of suggestibility that Myers writes about in Chapter 6. Be specific as to what aspects of suggestibility apply to the case.

TCO 6. In April of 2003, health officials in Toronto, Canada’s largest city, started seeing cases of an acute respiratory disease of unknown origin. The onset of the disease was sudden and deadly. Dubbed SARS (sudden acute respiratory syndrome), the disease killed 30 people in two different outbreak waves. The origins of the viral disease were unknown for weeks, as was how SARS spread. Even though the victims were clustered in healthcare and elder care facilities, everyone in Toronto, a city of three million people, grew increasingly anxious and fearful. Conventions and public events were cancelled, and people watched each other with suspicion to detect any signs of the illness. Discuss this with respect to the effects of suggestibility that Myers writes about in Chapter 6. Be specific as to what aspects of suggestibility apply to the case.

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