Home>Architecture and Design homework help>Essay Question

Prebles’ Artforms

Twelfth Edition

Chapter 13

Craft Media in Useful Objects

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Learning Objectives

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

13.2 Discuss some of the techniques used by artists working with glass.

13.3 Describe metalworking techniques used in the creation of functional objects.

13.4 Identify directional forces in a work of art and explain how artists use them.

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Introduction

William Morris, Windrush

Well-crafted, repeatable woodblock print

Can serve as textile or wallpaper pattern

Interior art improving public’s lives

Separation of art from “craft” in the Western world

Craft as “useful” objects

Artists challenging the notion of function

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

William Morris. Windrush. 1892. Textile pattern, repeatable. Woodblock print on paper. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. V&A Images, London/Art Resource, NY. [Fig. 13-1]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (1 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Soil with a heavily volcanic makeup mixed with water

Ceramics

The art and science of making objects from clay

Ceramists make any work with clay.

Potters specialize in making dishes.

Must fire a clay object at high temperatures in a kiln oven

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (2 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Types of clay

Earthenware

Porous, low-temperature firing

Stoneware

Heavier, high-temperature firing

Porcelain

Rarest, most expensive

Throwing

Shaping clay on a revolving wheel

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (3 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Process

Shape clay on potter’s wheel

Air dry piece

Fire in kiln

Decorating ceramics

Slip

A mixture of clay and water

Glaze

A liquid paint with a silica base

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (4 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Ancient Greece a center of pottery production

Usually made from terra cotta

Earthenware that can be fired at low temperature

Each step is done by a different person

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Eucharides Painter. Oil Jar with Man Holding a Lyre. Greek Attic Period. c.500–470 BCE. Height 13-5/16”. J. Paul Getty Museum, 73.AE.23. [Fig. 13-2]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (5 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Chinese ceramists perfected blue decoration on a white porcelain body

Known nearly worldwide in seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

Blue only color of glaze that could withstand high firing temperatures

Octagonal

Hand-built, not thrown on a wheel

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Octagonal P’ing Vase. China. Yuan Dynasty. 1179–1368.

Blue and white porcelain. People’s Republic of China/Bridgeman Images. [Fig. 13-3]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (6 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Recent works with divergent styles

Betty Woodman, Divided Vases: Cubist

Earthenware with a free-form look

Flat perforated panels in handles

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Betty Woodman. Divided Vases: Cubist. 2004. Glazed earthenware, epoxy resin, lacquer, and paint. 34-1⁄2” × 39” × 7”. Salon 94, New York. [Fig. 13-4]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Clay (7 of 7)

13.1 Identify the three general categories of clay and describe their characteristics.

 

Grayson Perry, Quotes from the Internet

Ironic sensibility

Resembles jug of whiskey

Used stoneware

Threw on a wheel

Casual approach parallels views about art

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Grayson Perry. Quotes from the Internet. 2005.

Glazed ceramic. 25-5/8” × 17-3/4”. © Grayson Perry. Courtesy of the artist and Victoria Miro, London. [Fig. 13-5]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Glass (1 of 4)

13.2 Discuss some of the techniques used by artists working with glass.

Chemically related to ceramic glaze

Wide range of manipulation

Stained glass

Blown glass

Inlays in various objects

Sensitive and amorphous when hot

Solidifies when it cools without crystallizing

Fluid nature producing line and volume

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Glass (2 of 4)

13.2 Discuss some of the techniques used by artists working with glass.

Stained glass

Reached peak in Middle Ages

Technique little changed since

The resurgence in Europe and the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries

Mary Lowndes, Resurrection Window

Painted liberally

Adventurous, unbalanced

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Mary Lowndes. Resurrection Window. 1901.

St. Mary’s Church, Sturminster Newton, UK.

craft images/Alamy Stock Photo. [Fig. 13-6]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Glass (3 of 4)

13.2 Discuss some of the techniques used by artists working with glass.

Dale Chihuly, Citron Basket Set

Inspired by Native American baskets

Older baskets tended to sag

Long series of glassworks to capture some of those shapes

Blew round piece of molten glass

Spinning it to open at one end and slump slightly

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Dale Chihuly. Citron Basket Set with Ebony Lip Wraps. 2015. Blown glass. 11” × 16” × 16”. Courtesy of the artist. [Fig. 13-7]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Glass (4 of 4)

13.2 Discuss some of the techniques used by artists working with glass.

Mona Hatoum, Nature morte aux grenades

Researched explosive devices and recreated them in colorful pieces

“Specimens” placed in a gurney

Used beauty of glass to represent lethal objects

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Mona Hatoum. Nature morte aux grenades (Still Life with Hand Grenades). 2006–7. Crystal, mild steel, rubber. 38-3⁄8” × 81-7⁄8” × 27-1⁄2”. Photograph: Marc Domage. Courtesy of Alexander and Bonin, New York. [Fig. 13-8]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Metal (1 of 3)

13.3 Describe metalworking techniques used in the creation of functional objects.

Metal

Strong and formidable

Can be hammered, cut, inlaid, drawn-out, welded, joined with rivets, or cast

Early metalsmiths created tools, vessels, armor, and weapons.

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Metal (2 of 3)

13.3 Describe metalworking techniques used in the creation of functional objects.

Muslim traditions in the 13th/14th centuries

Unparalleled sophistication

d’Arenberg Basin

Made for the last ruler of the Ayyubid dynasty

Body first cast in brass then inlaid with precisely cut pieces of silver

Highly detailed, even panels

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The d’Arenberg Basin. Probably Damascus, Syria. 1247–49. Brass inlaid with silver. 8-7⁄8” × 19-5⁄8”. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Purchase – Charles Lang Freer Endowment, F1955.10. [Fig. 13-9]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Metal (3 of 3)

13.3 Describe metalworking techniques used in the creation of functional objects.

Metal can be hammered or molded into elegant, useful shapes

Margaret De Patta, flatware

Believed daily objects should keep pace with modern art innovations

Simple shapes that do not sacrifice utility

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Margaret De Patta. Flatware Set. 1936. Silver, copper, stainless steel. Length of knife 9-3/8”. Decorative Arts Deaccession Fund (M.2007.20.1-.4). © 2018. Digital Image Museum Associates/LACMA/Art Resource, NY/Scala, Florence. © Estate of Margaret De Patta. [Fig. 13-10]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Wood (1 of 3)

13.4 Identify directional forces in a work of art and explain how artists use them.

The living spirit of wood offers vitality

Abundant, versatile, and warm qualities

Movement toward sustainability

Marquetry

Small pieces laid down

Unlike inlay, no bounding wall between the pieces of wood

Artist creates a cartoon, lays it on prepared wood, pricks holes

The artist cuts wood pieces and glues them into place

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Wood (2 of 3)

13.4 Identify directional forces in a work of art and explain how artists use them.

Peter Glass

Brought marquetry to the United States

Octagonal folding table

Highly ornate

30,000 pieces of wood used

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Peter Glass. Marquetry Table. 1868. Wood. Height 41”. DL*281476.0047. Division of Home and Community Life, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. [Fig. 13-11]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Wood (3 of 3)

13.4 Identify directional forces in a work of art and explain how artists use them.

Most wood is flexible when wet

Retains shape when dry

Nina Bruun, Nest Chair

Long, thin strips of flexed birch

Central cushion recalls where birds lay eggs

Arrived at design by trial and error

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Nina Bruun. Nest Chair. 2010.

Birchwood. Height 36”. Courtesy of the artist. [Fig. 13-12]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (1 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Mixing the heritage of traditional practices with new avenues of expression

Two classes

Work made with loom

Work made off-loom

Weaving

Interlacing of fibers

Warp fibers

Long fibers in place on a loom

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (2 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Weaving

Loom

The device holding fibers in place

Weft fibers

Cross warp fibers at a right angle

Can be sophisticated, complex

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (3 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Lara Baladi, Sandouk el Dounia (The World in a Box)

Large-scale tapestry

Created a huge collage of about 900 photographs

Programmed a digitally operated loom

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Lara Baladi. Sandouk el Dounia (The World in a Box). 2007. 10’4” × 8’2-4⁄10”. A tapestry made with a digitally operated looms from the original photo-collage of 900 C41 3-15/16” × 5-29/32” prints. Cini Foundation, Venice, 2011. [Fig. 13-13a]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Lara Baladi. Sandouk el Dounia (The World in a Box). 2007. Detail. [Fig. 13-13b]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (4 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Weaving

Ardabil Carpet

Sunburst surrounded by 16 oval shapes

Originally covered the floor of the prayer chapel

Required approximately 25 million knots

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Ardabil Carpet. Tabriz. 1540. Wool pile on silk warps and wefts. 34’ × 17’6”. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. V&A Images, London/Art Resource, NY. [Fig. 13-14]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (5 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Embroidery and Quilt Making

Embroidery

Artists stitch decorative colored threads into and over a base of woven fabric

Peru produced impressive textiles

Funerary cape

 

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Funerary Cape. Paracas Culture, Peru. c.200 CE. Museo Nacional de Anthropologia y Arqueologia, Lima, Peru. Photograph: Jorge Provenza. © 2018. DeAgostini Picture Library/Scala, Florence. [Fig. 13-15]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (6 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Embroidery and Quilt Making

Some African-American communities have long tradition of quilt making

Gees Bend, Alabama

Jessie Pettway, Bars and String-Piece Columns

Made from leftover pieces

Resembles some African textiles

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Jessie Pettway. Bars and String-Piece Columns. The 1950s. Cotton quilt. 95” × 76”. Tinwood Alliance Collection. San Francisco MoMA. Photograph: Steve Picking. © 2018 Jessie T. Pettway/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. [Fig. 13-16]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Textiles (7 of 7)

13.5 Discuss how artists use repetition and rhythm in their designs.

 

Faith Ringgold: Stitching History

“Story quilts”

Stories from her own life

Tradition in the family as far back as a great-great-grandmother

Quilting as an art form used by slave women

Depictions of African-American culture

Tar Beach later became a children’s book

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Faith Ringgold, with detail of The Purple Quilt. 1986. Photograph: C’Love. [Fig. 13-17]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Faith Ringgold. Tar Beach. (Part I from The Women on a Bridge series.) 1988. Acrylic on canvas, bordered with printed, painted, quilted, and pieced cloth. 74-5⁄8” × 68-1⁄2”. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Gus and Judith Lieber 1988. © 2018. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation/Art Resource, NY/Scala, Florence. © 2018 Faith Ringgold, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. [Fig. 13-18]

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright

Copyright © 2019, 2014, 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Purchase the answer to view it

blurred-text

47

"Order a similar paper and get 15% discount on your first order with us
Use the following coupon
"FIRST15"

Order Now