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the impact of the professional development plan on teachers in KSAIntroduction                 The purpose of writing this research is to know the impact of a professional development plan on teachers’ improvement in the KSA. In fact, a professional development plan for teacher in the KSA is one of the main problems that faces education there. To improve the education, we should improve teachers to drive the wheel of education toward the best. Teachers should be learners always to develop their abilities, expand their horizons of knowledge, and diversifies their methods. In addition, the evolution and improvement of education after teacher training and development periodically and the impact on education outcomes the KSA is one of the reasons for creating the Continuing professional development program(CPDP) in the KSA to make sure that teachers get benefits and success using new education method. (عبيد, 2008).                 A teacher is the most significant point in education because that educators have to improve teacher’s role and develop it but, before that they should believe in how greatness their role in the society. A teacher should take continuing training to make sure that s/he gets the benefits of training. Training should have a new professional styles for teaching and education (النجادى, 2001).                 Educators know the important impact of teachers on the students for that they always search for the new method to qualify teachers. When teachers get a best training and qualifying that means the education objectives will be achieved (النجادى, 2001).                            History of the professional development plans in the KSA:                In 1954, the professional development (PD) plans in the KSA started, but it was not for all the areas in the KSA. Some 1025 teachers benefited from the PD. Every time, the PD lasted 1 – 3 weeks, and it was given during the summer time. (General Directorate of Training and Scholarship, 2002).               from 1955 to1973, the Ministry of Education designed the professional development plans in many subjects to provide teachers with their subject’s materials, but the programs still in some areas not for the whole country (General Directorate of Training and Scholarship, 2002).               In 1974, the general directorate for training and scholarship was established, so the professional development plans have become one of the task the GDTS.                 In 1997, the teachers were increased. In addition, there was not training in all the KSA areas the GDTS built centers for the professional development plans to provide as many as they can of teachers by the professional development plans (General Directorate of Training and Scholarship,2002).               In 2006, the MOH used KING ABDULLAH PROJECT’s to develop education and teachers as the most important part of education. The program is developing until now (KAAPEDP, 2010).         Questions       I have asked some questions for teachers,   Do you know what is the professional development plan? where do you work? What do you teach? How important do you think the professional development plan is? Have you ever taken training? if your answer is yes, do you think it was useful for you?                                           What is teacher professional development plan?                    Kedzior and Fifield (2004) a description of the process of teaching in the classroom with the integration of teacher’s vision and objectives which match with levels, evaluations and the suggestions to improve witch have clues.                 Elmore (2002) a description of continuing training for professional development plan to be compatible with the best methods.                Is a process aimed at adding knowledge, develop skills, and professional values with the teacher to achieve breeding (1998, اللقاني).                   The impact of professional development plans on teacher’s improvement in the KSA research is a mixed research between quantities and qualitative. The research identifies for public and private teachers, all majors, men and women, and different ages of teachers in KSA.                 Six questions have asked to ten different teachers in the KSA. The questions show if the teachers have taken the professional development plans. Also, the questions illustrate their opinions about the professional devolvement plans and if it’s useful for them.                 The first question was about the meaning of the development professional plans and all the answers said they know what the professional development plans is. Second question was about where do they work and eight of them was in public school and two at private school. Third question was about their major and they were teaching humanity, science, math, and language. Four was the most important question if they believe the professional development plans are important or not and almost of the answers said yes. However, some said no that because they did not believe changing is important to improve their method of teaching. Question five was about if they have taken training and almost of them said Yes, but a few said no! In fact, because the professional development plans are not mandatory unfortunately in the KSA. The last question was for they who have taken training if they find it useful and all of them said yes.         Leadership:              A long time ago the educational supervisors believe the importance of having strong leadership, which owns skills to enable them to develop school. However, this concept is not working today because they understand that improving school need to share leadership. “This means distributed or shared leadership as a facet of social capital, a driving force in the success of teacher leadership” (Judith S. Nappi, 2014, p. 1).                        Teaching and learning is very important.  It is the responsibility of the educational leader to ensure that proper teaching and learning occurs.  Adult learning is actually very important in the school.  Principals and educational leaders should ensure that teachers have a great deal of access to learning, continuing education, and improvement learning.   The school should be like a community, where teachers can share their tips and teach the other teachers, meaning that everyone will be teaching and learning together.  This is the way to create a good environment in which learning is required and encouraged at every level (McKay, 2013).             It is important to create school-wide goals.  The leader should consider the teacher and lead by example.  Goals should be discussed during faculty meetings, as should progress and steps being taken that are conducive to reaching goals. By doing so, teachers will feel they are reaching their goals, and strive to consistently better themselves.  This is essential and is necessary to avoid complacency.  Teachers and educational leaders should constantly be looking for new ways to improve the instructional methods, student outcomes, achievement levels, and other issues in the school.  This will help the school to improve and focus on any problem areas.  It will also allow teachers to voice their opinions and have an active part in creating an exemplary school (McKay, 2013).               When leaders collaborate and participate their roles with other that creates more leaders. Also, that makes leadership is successful and influential in the development of the school. In addition, a good leader should share the objectives with the teachers. In fact, a teacher must work outside his/her classroom. “The need to attract and retain quality teachers is another reason to extend t
he role of the teacher to domains outside of the classroom walls, as “isolation is a primary reason that new teachers leave” (Heller, 2004, p. 6).               The continued training and the development method of the educational process is a prerequisite for making a qualified generation of leaders and teachers (Smith, 2013).   An empirical study that concluded that the current system in Saudi Arabia views leadership as a single responsibility, rather than collaborative group effort.  Leadership is not a priority, but rather the maintenance of the current system.  The system does not take time to develop its staff and its leaders.  This heavily contradicts the system of centralized decision making that is typically done inside the actual educational system with teachers (Algarni, 2014)                   The objectives of the professional development plans for Teacher First of all, to keep abreast of developments in the field of learning theory and education work to be applied to achieve efficiency in education. Second, the link between theory and practice in educational fields. Third, to Establish the principle of continuous learning and reliance on self-learning techniques. Fourth, to development contemporary techniques in the delivery of information to the learner skills. Fifth, to contribute the educational issues and sophisticated scientific manner. Finally, to develop competencies and skills assessment kinds specifically self-assessment skills (الفنيش و زيدان ,2000).                        The areas of professional development for teachers The professional development plans have several areas for teacher. For example, the field of human relations, guidance and direction. Also, the field of teaching performance and the use of modern technology. additionally, Scientific research and academic supervision. Last, the field of curriculum design and development according to contemporary developments in knowledge and information (Darrow, Fisher, Alien.R.van ,1972).   The objectives of training,                 There are several aims of the training that some teachers do not know and those are very important.As a matter of fact, to provide teacher with knowledge and skills to qualify them doing different tasks. Likewise, to teach them how important is continuing learning.Equally important, to develop and improve their skills and abilities.Also,to help educators know new thing in education.In Addition, to support their creative think that adjust them with their jobs to face problem and overcome it. To save time and money.To the end that,to limit the absent between workers (Abdulhadi,2002).                 The importance to apply a Professional Development Plan in education. In the first place, to improve educational process outputs. Moreover, competition to upgrade the quality level of the educational system. As a matter of fact, to satisfy students because he is the goal of the educational process. similarly, to investment worker’s possibilities in the educational process. Not to mention, the transfer of power to the employees of the institution while maintaining centralized management. Equally important, to change the pattern of organizational culture management at the institution by changing the prevailing values and behavior to achieve a comprehensive qualify. In short, to change the management to the democratic style (Albana, 2007).   How does a teacher development program support education?              It helps to meet the needs of teachers to develop skills in their fields. Fill the needs of students, including expands the abilities of mind. Planning and evaluation of the educational process on an ongoing basis to ensure the continued improvement and development. Use the technology and modern teaching aids incorporate modern learning methods and the application of theories education for change. The program is designed to match the need and achieve aims (Alghamdi, 2011).              Learning in a professional development plan is part of the process and it join to the aims to success. A professional development plan helps to understand and adjust learning environment. Always education needs like these programs to create and make new ideas, strategies, and tools which can make learning easy and improve teachers job.          The education policy in the KSA in article 170 says, “teacher training is an ongoing process to raise their level and renew their knowledge and expertise (General Directorate of Training and Scholarship,2011).     Vision:            In the future the development professional plans in the KSA should not be optional to insure all teachers get training. Next, Teachers who get training should be motivated to take more. After that, observe teachers inside classroom to see how they work after training if they improve their method or try to develop it. Then, do test for them. After, evaluate teachers. Also, training course should be developed and changed to be useful for all kinds of teachers that by study all successful experience from other countries which are successful in this field. Finally, make workshops around the cities in the KSA to observe how it works.  The impact of teacher development plans in the KSA:          The Professional development plans are very necessary for all staff who work in education. Indeed, teachers are the most important part in the process of training. Therefore, the Professional development plans help teachers to be confident and to know the best ways to teach with various styles. They teach educators how to learn and creative ways of teaching, because that is the way they should be. Professional development plans develop their skills and abilities. In addition, they know how to use technology in the way that supposed to be. The professional development plans qualify teachers to do their responsibilities on the right way to achieve the overall quality. Professional development plans are essential to improve education. It is developing teaching and learning.                           the reasons of this research is to show the impact of a Professional Development Plan on teacher’s improvement in the KSA. The old teachers do not like to take training and they like to teach in the traditional way which means no using technology no using professional new teaching method. However, new teachers love to teach in the professional new ways and use technology. They like to learn everything that help them to develop their method in education. The Professional Development Plans help teachers and administrators to be in the middle of the process to understand it and it easy to evaluate them.                                                                                                                                                                                      SOURCES      Darrow, Helen Fisher, Alien.R.van (1972). Independent for Creative Learning CN: Y: Teacher collage press  Heller, D. A. (2004). Teachers wanted: Attracting and retaining good teachers. Alexandria. VA: ASCD. SMITH, I; ADDISON, C. THE ‘NEW’ SCHOOL LEADER: TRAINING INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERS FOR A NEW GENERATION OF TEACHERS AND LEARNERS. Academy of Educational Leadership Journal. 17, 2, 135-140, June 2013. ISSN: 10956328. Algarni, F., & Male, T. (2014). Leadership in Saudi Arabian Public Schools: Time for Devolution? http://edglossary.org/professional-development/ Elmore, R. (2002). Bridging the gap between standards and achievement: The imperative for professional development education [Brochure]. Washington, DC: Albert Shanker Institute. Kedzior, M., & Fifield, S. (2004). Teacher professional development. Education Policy Brief, 15(21), 76–97. General Directorate of Training and Scholarship. (2002). A guide to ed
ucational training and scholarship. Jeddah: Almadina Printing and Publishing. General Directorate of Training and Scholarship. (2011). About the Directorate, Retrieved from Http://portal.moe.gov.sa/training/Pages/aboutagency1.aspx King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Public Education development Project (KAAPEDP). (2010). Tatweer project. Retrieved from http://www.tatweer.edu.sa/Ar/Pages/default.aspx  http://www.tatweer.edu.sa/content/aboutus Aleasa, A. (2009). Education reform in Saudi Arabia. Beirut: Dar Alsaqi. Alghamdi, (2011). Teachers Continuing Professional Development Programs of the Kingdom of  Saudi Arabia  You don’t have to be bad to get better: a leader’s guide to improving teacher quality / Candi B. McKay, foreword by Charlotte Danielson Nappi, Judith S. Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, Summer2014, Vol. 80 Issue 4, p29-34, 6p, Database: Education Source Individualizing professional development: a framework for meeting school and district goals / Vicki R. Husby; foreword by Jo Blasé     APA Reference FormatsThe following are examples of many of the types ofreferences you may need to include in your researchpaper.These examples follow APA style guidelines set forth in the fifth edition of the Publication Manual AmericanPsychological Association.Type of Reference Reference FormantBookBandura, A. J. (1977). Social learning theory.Englewood Cliffs, N.J:Prentice Hall.Book, EditedGibbs, J. T., & Huang, L. N. (Eds). (1991). Children of color: Psychologicalintervention with minority youth. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Book, ChapterO’Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender rolejourneys. Metaphor for healing, transition, andtransformation. In B. R.Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issue across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). NewYork: Springer.Book, ReviewSchatz, B. R. (2000). Learning by text or context? [Review of the bookThe social life of information]. Science, 290, 1304.Journal ArticleKlimoski, R., & Palmer, S. (1993). The ADA and the hiring process inorganizations. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research,45(2), 10-36.Electronic Sources,Eid, M., & Langeheine, R. (1999). The measurementof consistency andRetrieval Informationoccasion specificity with latent class models: Anew model and itsapplication to the measurement of affect. Psychological Methods, 4,100-116, Retrieved November 19, 2000, from the PsycARTICLESdatabase.AbstractNakazato, K., Shimonaka, Y., & Homma, A. (1992).Cognitive functions ofcentenarians: The Tokyo Metropolitan Centenarian Study. JapaneseJournal of Developmental Psychology, 3, 9-16. Abstract obtained fromPsycSCAN: Neuropsychology, 1993, 2, Abstract No. 604.ERIC ReferenceMead, J. V. (1992). Looking at old photographs: Investigating theteacher tales that novice teachers bring with them (Report No. NCRTL-PR-92-4). East Lansing, MI: National Center forResearch on TeacherLearning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED346082).DissertationWilfley, D. E. (1989). Interpersonal analyses ofbulimia: Normal-weightunpublishedand obese. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri,Columbia. APA Reference FormatsThe following are examples of many of the types ofreferences you may need to include in your researchpaper.These examples follow APA style guidelines set forth in the fifth edition of the Publication Manual AmericanPsychological Association.Type of Reference Reference FormantBookBandura, A. J. (1977). Social learning theory.Englewood Cliffs, N.J:Prentice Hall.Book, EditedGibbs, J. T., & Huang, L. N. (Eds). (1991). Children of color: Psychologicalintervention with minority youth. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Book, ChapterO’Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender rolejourneys. Metaphor for healing, transition, andtransformation. In B. R.Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issue across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). NewYork: Springer.Book, ReviewSchatz, B. R. (2000). Learning by text or context? [Review of the bookThe social life of information]. Science, 290, 1304.Journal ArticleKlimoski, R., & Palmer, S. (1993). The ADA and the hiring process inorganizations. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research,45(2), 10-36.Electronic Sources,Eid, M., & Langeheine, R. (1999). The measurementof consistency andRetrieval Informationoccasion specificity with latent class models: Anew model and itsapplication to the measurement of affect. Psychological Methods, 4,100-116, Retrieved November 19, 2000, from the PsycARTICLESdatabase.AbstractNakazato, K., Shimonaka, Y., & Homma, A. (1992).Cognitive functions ofcentenarians: The Tokyo Metropolitan Centenarian Study. JapaneseJournal of Developmental Psychology, 3, 9-16. Abstract obtained fromPsycSCAN: Neuropsychology, 1993, 2, Abstract No. 604.ERIC ReferenceMead, J. V. (1992). Looking at old photographs: Investigating theteacher tales that novice teachers bring with them (Report No. NCRTL-PR-92-4). East Lansing, MI: National Center forResearch on TeacherLearning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED346082).DissertationWilfley, D. E. (1989). Interpersonal analyses ofbulimia: Normal-weightunpublishedand obese. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri,Columbia.APA Reference FormatsThe following are examples of many of the types ofreferences you may need to include in your researchpaper.These examples follow APA style guidelines set forth in the fifth edition of the Publication Manual AmericanPsychological Association.Type of Reference Reference FormantBookBandura, A. J. (1977). Social learning theory.Englewood Cliffs, N.J:Prentice Hall.Book, EditedGibbs, J. T., & Huang, L. N. (Eds). (1991). Children of color: Psychologicalintervention with minority youth. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Book, ChapterO’Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender rolejourneys. Metaphor for healing, transition, andtransformation. In B. R.Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issue across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). NewYork: Springer.Book, ReviewSchatz, B. R. (2000). Learning by text or context? [Review of the bookThe social life of information]. Science, 290, 1304.Journal ArticleKlimoski, R., & Palmer, S. (1993). The ADA and the hiring process inorganizations. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research,45(2), 10-36.Electronic Sources,Eid, M., & Langeheine, R. (1999). The measurementof consistency andRetrieval Informationoccasion specificity with latent class models: Anew model and itsapplication to the measurement of affect. Psychological Methods, 4,100-116, Retrieved November 19, 2000, from the PsycARTICLESdatabase.AbstractNakazato, K., Shimonaka, Y., & Homma, A. (1992).Cognitive functions ofcentenarians: The Tokyo Metropolitan Centenarian Study. JapaneseJournal of Developmental Psychology, 3, 9-16. Abstract obtained fromPsycSCAN: Neuropsychology, 1993, 2, Abstract No. 604.ERIC ReferenceMead, J. V. (1992). Looking at old photographs: Investigating theteacher tales that novice teachers bring with them (Report No. NCRTL-PR-92-4). East Lansing, MI: National Center forResearch on TeacherLearning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED346082).DissertationWilfley, D. E. (1989). Interpersonal analyses ofbulimia: Normal-weightunpublishedand obese. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri,Columbia.  APA Reference FormatsThe following are examples of many of the types ofreferences you may need to include in your researchpaper.These examples follow APA style guidelines set forth in the fifth edition of the Publication Manual AmericanPsychological Association.Type of Reference Reference FormantBookBandura, A. J. (1977). Social learning theory.Englewood Cliffs, N.J:Prentice Hall.Book, EditedGibbs, J. T., & Huang, L. N. (Eds). (1991). Children of color: Psychologicalintervention with minority youth. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Book, ChapterO’Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender rolejourneys. Metaphor for healing, transition, andtransformation. In B. R.Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issue across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). NewYork: Springer.Book, ReviewSchatz, B. R. (2000). Learning by text or context? [R
eview of the bookThe social life of information]. Science, 290, 1304.Journal ArticleKlimoski, R., & Palmer, S. (1993). The ADA and the hiring process inorganizations. Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research,45(2), 10-36.Electronic Sources,Eid, M., & Langeheine, R. (1999). The measurementof consistency andRetrieval Informationoccasion specificity with latent class models: Anew model and itsapplication to the measurement of affect. Psychological Methods, 4,100-116, Retrieved November 19, 2000, from the PsycARTICLESdatabase.AbstractNakazato, K., Shimonaka, Y., & Homma, A. (1992).Cognitive functions ofcentenarians: The Tokyo Metropolitan Centenarian Study. JapaneseJournal of Developmental Psychology, 3, 9-16. Abstract obtained fromPsycSCAN: Neuropsychology, 1993, 2, Abstract No. 604.ERIC ReferenceMead, J. V. (1992). Looking at old photographs: Investigating theteacher tales that novice teachers bring with them (Report No. NCRTL-PR-92-4). East Lansing, MI: National Center forResearch on TeacherLearning. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED346082).DissertationWilfley, D. E. (1989). Interpersonal analyses ofbulimia: Normal-weightunpublishedand obese. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Missouri,Columbia.

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